Oldest House Circa 1646 Barrio De Analco Historic District 215 E. De Vargas St. Santa Fe. NM  87501 505-988-2488 inquiry@oldesthousesantafe.com Open 9:00 am - 6:00 pm every day
Native American Jewelry and Southwestern Gifts
Timeless Treasures in an atmosphere where the past lives on…
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Barrio De Analco Historic District
The National Historic Landmark Barrio De Analco Historic District in Santa Fe, New Mexico is one of the oldest residential neighborhoods of European origin in the United States.  Originally settled in 1620 by the Spanish, Barrio (or District) de Analco suffered major destruction during the 1680 Great Pueblo Revolt.  The Spanish rebuilt Analco beginning in 1692 during their recolonization of New Mexico.  The buildings of Analco are in the Spanish Pueblo and Territorial styles that reflect the merger of Spanish, Indian and eventually American building techniques.  In the seven adobe brick buildings that make up the Barrio de Analco Historic District visitors can see how working-class Spanish colonists, Tlaxcalan Indians and other American Indians lived in Santa Fe during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. The Spanish first settled Santa Fe during the winter of 1609-1610 as they sought to “civilize” the North American continent and to expand their New World empire.  Mirroring other Spanish colonial settlements of the era, the colony in Santa Fe was a defensible fort and village set around a central plaza.  Also featured in this itinerary, the Santa Fe Plaza became the commercial, social and political center of the community.  Fearing attacks from the local Pueblo Indians, many high-ranking Spanish officials and citizens built their homes around the plaza because it was a central defendable area. As Santa Fe prospered, the original settlement expanded to include growing neighborhoods on the opposite side of the Santa Fe River from the plaza.  By 1620, the newly constructed Chapel of San Miguel was in place and a suburb, the Barrio de Analco, began to grow.  The Tlaxcalan Indian word, “Analco,” means “the other side of the river,” which distinguished this barrio from the neighborhood on the plaza side of the Santa Fe River where government officials and other prominent citizens resided and attended mass.  The Chapel of San Miguel provided laborers, artisans and Tlaxcalan Indian servants with a place to worship in the growing suburb.
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Oldest House Circa 1646 Barrio De Analco Historic District 215 E. De Vargas St. Santa Fe. NM  87501 505-988-2488 inquiry@oldesthousesantafe.com Open 9:00 am - 6:00 pm every day
Native American Jewelry and Southwestern Gifts
Timeless Treasures in an atmosphere where the past lives on…
Copyright Oldest House Santa Fe 2016
Bario De Analco Historic District
The   National   Historic   Landmark   Barrio   De Analco   Historic   District   in   Santa   Fe, New   Mexico   is   one   of   the   oldest   residential   neighborhoods   of   European   origin in   the   United   States.      Originally   settled   in   1620   by   the   Spanish,   Barrio   (or District)   de   Analco   suffered   major   destruction   during   the   1680   Great   Pueblo Revolt.         The     Spanish     rebuilt    Analco     beginning     in     1692     during     their recolonization   of   New   Mexico.      The   buildings   of   Analco   are   in   the   Spanish Pueblo   and   Territorial   styles   that   reflect   the   merger   of   Spanish,   Indian   and eventually   American   building   techniques.      In   the   seven   adobe   brick   buildings that   make   up   the   Barrio   de   analco   Historic   District   visitors   can   see   how working-class    Spanish    colonists,    Tlaxcalan    Indians    and    other    American Indians lived in Santa Fe during the late 17th and early 18th centuries. The   Spanish   first   settled   Santa   Fe   during   the   winter   of   1609-1610   as   they sought   to   “civilize”   the   North   American   continent   and   to   expand   their   New World   empire.      Mirroring   other   Spanish   colonial   settlements   of   the   era,   the colony   in   Santa   Fe   was   a   defensible   fort   and   village   set   around   a   central plaza.        Also    featured    in    this    itinerary,    the    Santa    Fe    Plaza    became    the commercial,   social,   and   political   center   of   the   community.      Fearing   attacks from    the    local    Pueblo    Indians,    many    high-ranking    Spanish    officials    and citizens    built    their    homes    around    the    plaza    because    it    was    a    central defendable area. As   Santa   Fe   prospered,   the   original   settlement   expanded   to   include   growing neighborhoods   on   the   opposite   side   of   the   Santa   Fe   River   from   the   plaza.      By 1620,   the   newly   constructed   Chapel   of   San   Miguel   was   in   place   and   a   suburb, the   Barrio   de   Analco,   began   to   grow.      The   Tlaxcalan   Indian   word,   “Analco,” means   “the   other   side   of   the   river,”   which   distinguished   this   barrio   from   the neighborhood   on   the   plaza   side   of   the   Santa   Fe   River   where   government officials   and   other   prominent   citizens   resided   and   attended   mass.     The   Chapel of   San   Miguel   provided   laborers,   artisans   and   Tlaxcalan   Indian   servants   with a place to worship in the growing suburb.